[UNPRODUCED WORK]

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MetLife Perfect Company Stunt

Or, how to advertise an employee benefit trends survey

 

 

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Making a Perfect Company from Scratch

MetLife came to us to find a way to share their Employee Benefits Trend Survey with the world. If businesses could see what the workforce actually wants out of their benefits/employer, maybe they'd be interested in getting their insurance from the messenger: MetLife.

Our solve: Take the results of the survey and use them to create the perfect company, advertise it, and take advantage of a workplace climate that puts money over people.

Introducing...

 Pono, n.: A Hawaiian word with many meanings including righteousness, correct or proper procedure, well-being, prosperity, welfare, and benefit. 

Pono, n.: A Hawaiian word with many meanings including righteousness, correct or proper procedure, well-being, prosperity, welfare, and benefit. 

OOH

To catch headlines fast, we created an OOH campaign targeting hot button issues surrounding the workplace and the current news cycle. We also wanted to take advantage of the real estate we had to work with: MetLife's building in NYC.

More Placements

PONO needed to seem like a company that would spread the good word on a better workplace everywhere it could. Whether that includes a gender pay gay stunt, taking advantage of Google's SEO, or talking to the workforce wherever they are (you know, online or at the bar).

Website Reveal

The landing page for all of our OOH placements had to show PONO for what it was: the perfect company for employees. At first glance it looks like any other start up website, but once you get down to it, you realize it says nothing about what PONO does, only what PONO is—employee first. At the end you get a subtle reveal—your business can be just as perfect as this one; just read the MetLife Employee Benefit Trends Survey.

Cheeky Client Interaction

To keep the ball rolling on this project, we wrote a letter from our fake company's CEO to MetLife's Global CMO about how excited the former was to work with the latter.

The Outcome

Ultimately, the campaign would gain momentum from various publications writing articles about how MetLife hacked the system to get the world excited about a company that doesn't exist, and a survey that might help create it.

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Extra credit

We also tried to sell MetLife on not beating around the bush and owning all of these issues themselves. What better way to advertise your Employee Benefit Trends Survey than by calling yourself out? The angle was simple: How do we give ourselves permission for standing behind all of these important, news-dominating issues? We point out our flaws and invite everyone to do the same.